Get Along Little Dogies

July 30, 2006 at 7:42 am 10 comments

For all of you non-cowpokes out there, a “dogie” (pronounced doe-gy) is actually an orphaned calf. (Thanks for the correction, Rudy!)  This is a fun little cowboy song that I learned way back in third grade.

As I was out walking one morning for pleasure
I spied a cowpuncher a-riding along
His hat was throwed back and his spurs were a-jingling
And as he approached he was singing this song

[Chorus]

Whoopie-ti-yi-yo
Get along little dogies
It’s your misfortune and none of my own
Whoopie-ti-yi-yo
Get along little dogies
You know that Wyoming will be your new home

Early in spring we round up all the dogies
Mark them and brand them and bob off their tails
Round up the horses and load the chuck wagon
And throw all them dogies right out on the trail

Note: I’m not quite sure whether we learned the chorus as “Whoopiee-ti-yi-yo” or “Yippee-…”  Both sound familiar, and I guess it doesn’t really matter which way you sing it.

There are other verses available on the internet, but these are the ones that I learned and that seemed the most appropriate for kids.

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10 Comments Add your own

  • 1. M-ko  |  March 23, 2007 at 4:16 pm

    I remember it being “Yippie-ki-yi-yo”, but it was a long time ago. After all, I too learned it in 3rd grade, or was it 2nd?

    Reply
  • 2. Rudy Robbins  |  September 8, 2008 at 3:02 pm

    A dogie is NOT a cow. It is an orphaned calf. Take this from a 74 year old Texas cowboy. I have been singing cowboy songs since I was old enough to do so. I remember the words as Whoopie ti yi yo. Some of you may have heard of my cowboy band of a few years back, known as the “Spirit of Texas.” The State of Texas designated us the “Official Cowboy Band for Texas”. Since folk songs get passed down by word of mouth, it is not unusual for there to be different versions, as rememberd by different people.

    Reply
  • 3. Kyle  |  December 9, 2008 at 11:03 am

    Rudy, thanks for the correction and for the visit! Having lived my entire life in the Lone Star State, I have most certainly heard of the Spirit of Texas, founded by the famous (’round these parts) Rudy “It Do” Robbins. I am honored to have you visit the Kid Songs site!

    Reply
  • 4. Mitzi Merritt  |  May 1, 2009 at 3:41 pm

    I’ve heard this song since I was a little girl, not going to say how long ago, but I’m turning 62 this summer. I seem to remember it as “Yippie, ti-yi-yea” though. Of course, I’m from Tennessee insteaed of from Texas, but watched cowboy movies and read western novels my whole life with my Dad who has passed on, but who left me with the love of cowboy songs and stories. I got this song in my head a few days ago and wanted to remember the lyrics to sing it to my granddaughter who is 7. Thanks a lot for having it out there where we can still get it!!

    Reply
  • 5. crystal  |  June 16, 2009 at 7:11 pm

    I love this song. My dad taught it to my sister and I when we were kids. We grew up on a dairy farm in Wisconsin. I’m 26 now. I remember it as “whoopie” and the last line was “and we’ll head out on the trail for Idaho”. There were also more verses.

    Reply
  • 6. susie  |  February 26, 2010 at 12:11 pm

    I’m a Yippie-ki-yi-yo girl, too, and also learned it when I was 6 years old, from a Young People’s Record…
    such a joy to read these comments

    Reply
  • 7. C Chaves  |  May 13, 2011 at 3:47 pm

    However these nonsensical lyrics are sung, they come from corrupted Spanish.

    Com-a-ti-yi yippi, yippi yea, yippi yea,
    Spanish – Como esta alla epa, epa eh, epa eh?
    English – How are things over there? Hey, eh?

    See page 2 in this Chapter;

    http://www.nmhcpl.org/uploads/CH7.pdf

    Reply
  • 8. Complete the Sentence...  |  May 13, 2011 at 10:23 pm

    [...] to get' rather than constantly 'dogging' you! :S *Get along little 'dogies' . . . _ _ _ _ _ * http://kidsongs.wordpress.com/2006/0…little-dogies/ Reply With Quote + Reply to [...]

    Reply
  • 9. Nilda  |  May 22, 2012 at 7:55 pm

    My daughter’s second grade class is working on pioneer projects the last 2 weeks of school. One of the tasks was to sing a folk song to her class. When she heard this song she said that was the one. It’s one of those songs that get’s stuck in your head. What is a cow puncher? What is bob off their tails mean?

    Reply
  • 10. Angela  |  August 2, 2012 at 12:51 pm

    Well, I never heard this sone before but have it now on my 2 year old’s cd. I love this song!

    Reply

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